e-book Looking at Medea: essays and a translation of Euripides’ tragedy

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The essays are accompanied by David Stuttard's English translation of the play, which is performer-friendly, accessible yet accurate and closely faithful to the original. Additional Product Features Place of Publication. Show More Show Less. Best Selling in Nonfiction. Permanent Record by Edward Snowden , Hardcover 1.

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The story of Medea is one of the best known from ancient Greece and the play is one of the most widely translated Greek tragedies. As a result readers come to Medea knowing in some detail what will happen.

David Stuttard - Wikipedia

Unlike other Greek tragedies there are no strong reversals and few surprises. When the play begins events have already reached a crisis. There will be no veering. All of this pushes the play in the direction of melodrama. As a translator, one of my biggest concerns was to find a way to control the almost hysterical emotional energy of the play so that it avoided becoming shrill with anger and blame or claustrophobic with revenge. This is a problem that modern actors and directors can partially solve through setting, pacing, gesture, and tone. I wanted, however, to make the text itself capable of controlling and releasing this emotional energy so as not to exhaust the reader too soon as well and perhaps to make the tragic events more plausible.

In the end, I wanted the play to read with the force and clarity of a dramatic poem. Uncertain of how to solve the problem of melodrama, I began by tightening and compressing the language. It also contains some of the most graphic and horrific images found in Greek tragedy. Medea Our long wait for palace news is over. Listen, he gasps from exertion. When he arrives expect to hear about disaster. Messenger Medea, such crimes, heinous—inhuman— You must go, now, by any means, land or sea.

Why should I escape? Messenger The princess and her father, Creon, lie dead, victims of your poison. Medea Splendid news! Let me reward you with my undying friendship and protection. Messenger Madness speaks through you. Pay special attention to their agony so I might take some pleasure. A shout went up that you and Jason had called a truce.

This was like music to our ears. Suddenly, we wanted to kiss the children, touch their lovely hair. At first she saw only Jason but when the children came into view, she veiled her eyes, and turned away.

Looking at Medea: Essays and a translation of Euripides' tragedy

Your job is to love those your husband loves. Accept them graciously and for my sake ask your father to release these children from their exile. She agreed to what her husband asked. So eager was she to wear the treasures, even before Jason and the boys had reached the road, she put on the colorful dress, set the gold crown on her head, and in a bright mirror arranged her hair.

She laughed with pleasure at the beautiful but lifeless image.